Rhode Island Divorce, Child Custody & RI Family Law Info.

Welcome to the Rhode Island Divorce, child custody and Family Law Articles and Information Center. This domestic relations legal blog is authored and edited  by Rhode Island divorce attorney David Slepkow. This resource contains hundreds of original, extensive and informative family law,  RI divorce, child support and custody Law articles. All articles were authored by East Providence RI divorce lawyer, David Slepkow. Visit David Slepkow’s Law Firm Website here: Slepkow Slepkow & Associates, Inc.

Provided by Rhode Island Divorce Attorney and Child Custody  Lawyer David Slepkow.

 

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Read Rhode Island child custody lawyer, David Slepkow’s  Client ratings here. Fill out the form or call 401-437-1100 to contact Rhode Island family lawyer David Slepkow.

Real RI Family LAW  and Rhode Island Divorce Information, Real answers and no platitudes here!

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NO Enabling!!

RI Divorce Attorney David  Slepkow offers free initial consultations. David  Slepkow has earned a superb rating from AVVO 10 out of 10 and is honored to be Sworn in as a member of the United States Supreme Court Bar. David is a partner and owner of Slepkow Slepkow & Associates, Inc. which was established in 1932. If you are looking for an enabler or for someone to tell you what you want to hear then please meet with a different attorney.

Family Law Attorney enabling is a form of bait and switch. It is when an attorney takes a big fee and paints an overly optimistic potential outcome of your case and the Court process.  The lawyer essentially tells the client what he or she wants to hear in order to get the client to pay a large retainer. As the case goes on and the realities set in, the Rhode Island divorce lawyer later resets realistic expectations.A bait and switch is when a RI Family Court attorney tells you what you want to hear in order to get you to retain him or make you feel better about yourself.

This Blog also includes Rhode Island Domestic Relations Statutes,  RI Supreme Court Case law, Commentary, Helpful Links, National Family Law information, Law Links, Approved Articles by Out of State Family Law Attorneys as well as other useful Info.

Rhode Island divorce attorney

Rhode Island divorce lawyer, David Slepkow concentrates in the following areas of  Rhode Island Family Law: divorce, Child Custody, Child Support, Visitation, Mediation, Paternity, Adoption, DCYF, Post Divorce, Relocation Out Of State, Multi State Child Support and Child Custody, Motions to modify or terminate child support, Contempt Motions,  restraining orders, domestic abuse, uncontested divorce,  alimony (spousal support), criminal law, restraining orders, contempt, real estate and family law  etc.

This website goes way beyond the standard cookie cutter information you will find about Rhode Island divorce and domestic Law. All RI law articles were written by RI divorce Attorney, David Slepkow.  David also successfully appealed a Family Court case to the RI Supreme Court and was able to overtur n/ vacate a Family Court ruling in a 5-0 decision in favor of his client.  This was a groundbreaking RI Case which preserved the rights of people to relocate out of Rhode Island during their divorce. Read the case here:  Rogers v. Rogers

Representing clients in RI family Court in all areas of Family Law,  Rhode Island Divorce and Custody.

Important Divorce, family law and Marriage Statistics :

“Since the 1950s, the median age at first marriage has risen for both men and women, increasing from 23 for men and 20 for women in 1950, to 28 for men and 26 for women” http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p70-125.pdf U.S. Census Bureau

“In the United States, researchers estimate that 40%–50% of all first marriages, and 60% of second marriages, will end in divorce.” http://www.divorce.usu.edu/files/uploads/Lesson3.pdf

“Since 1974, 1 million children a year have seen their parents divorce, and 45 percent of all American children can expect their families to break up before they reach the age of 18” http://www.scu.edu/ethics/publications/iie/v9n2/divorce.html

The Center for disease control (CDC) reports: “What demographic, economic, and social factors affect the chances that marriage will succeed or fail? This report shows that a number of characteristics are closely associated with the chances that a marriage will continue or break up. For first marriages, for example, marriages are less likely to break up, and more likely to succeed, if the wife grew up in a two-parent home, is Asian, was 20 years of age or over at marriage, did not have any children when she got married, is college-educated, has more income, or has any religious affiliation.” http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_23/sr23_022.pdf

Wikipedia states: “Like marriage, divorce in the United States is the province of the state governments, not the federal government. Divorce or “dissolution of marriage” is a legal process in which a judge or other authority dissolves the bonds of matrimony existing between two persons, thus restoring them to the status of being single and permitting them to marry other individuals. The legal process for divorce may also involve issues of spousal support, child custody, child support, distribution of property and division of debt, though these matters are usually only ancillary or consequential to the dissolution of the marriage” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divorce_in_the_United_States

 

Some of the latest Divorce Articles:

  • Letter for children to give to parents to stop custody war
    Here is a letter for children to give to their parents who are involved in a highly contested and bitter custody, visitation or divorce war. This letter is for kids who want their parents to stop fighting and feuding regarding custody and visitation Dear Mom and Dad, I love both of you equally but I […] The post Letter for children to give to parents to stop […]
  • Common Reasons Why People Request to Modify Child Support
    Many people are unaware that after a child support amount is established  by the Providence Family Court, it can be changed. The RI Family Court Court will require that the reason for the change is valid and that there has been a substantial change in circumstances since the prior court order. Simply not wanting to […] The post Common Reasons Why People Requ […]
  • Less Common Reasons for Divorce in Rhode Island
    In most cases, the pathway that leads to divorce or separation is very understandable to every member of the family. Often times, married couples develop long-term patterns of infidelity, abuse, addiction or deceit. However, in some incidences, the reasons for becoming divorced are more difficult to comprehend. The less common reasons for getting divorced in […]

David is also an experienced Family Law Appellate attorney representing clients in Divorce and Family Court Appeals in front of the Rhode Island Supreme Court. If you are seeking a Family Law mediator rather than an advocate than please contact David Slepkow in his capacity as a mediator. David will schedule a Divorce, Child Custody or Family Law Mediation.

David Slepkow offers Free Initial Consultations as well as evening appointments. David makes every effort to accommodate out of state clients who are unable to travel to Rhode Island for Consultations or court Appearances. David represents clients in Providence,  Bristol, Kent, Newport and Washington County. Providence County Family Court Jurisdiction includes Barrington, Cumberland, Lincoln, Riverside, Rumford, Bristol, Warren, East Providence, Pawtucket,  Central Falls, Johnston, North Providence and Cranston.

David also has substantial experience aggressively representing clients in Rhode Island Criminal Law Matters.  Many Divorce and Family Law Matters involve issues concerning Domestic Assault, Domestic Disorderly Conduct, Interference with use of a telephone and Violations of No Contact Orders or Restraining Orders.

David has an extensive collection of  Criminal Law Articles and Rhode Island Divorce Law Articles.

Three Tips to Remember for Family Court

Make an effort to avoid bringing your child or children into the case. Don’t comment negatively about the other parent, and don’t argue with your spouse in front of the child. Don’t try to draw your child away from the other parent. If you have to explain the case to your children, don’t give them more information than you need to. If you involve them in the case too much, it could give them long-lasting emotional problems. Throughout the case, make a sincere effort to help your child maintain a healthy relationship with their other parent.

If you’re still married but ready to move on and engage in a new relationship before the divorce proceedings are over, avoid introducing your children to this new person in your life for now. If you do, it will upset your children and possibly give them emotional problems. At the same time, the emergence of this situation will not be fair to the other parent or to the new person in your life, who will now be drawn into the custody battle as well.

The court’s perception of you may affect the outcome of your case, so dress and act accordingly when you go to court.

Don’t behave as if you’re the source of problems in the case. Instead, make an effort to be perceived by the Court as trying to solve the complicated issues. No matter what, don’t make it easy for the judge to assume that you’re unwilling to work with the court and reach an appropriate solution. With so many cases to handle, judges are unlikely to have much patience if you seem to not want to work with them and are actively causing problems. This doesn’t mean that you should compromise your position if it is reasonable. You should keep your mind open towards a potential settlement.

  1. Dress appropriately for your day in Rhode Island Family Court. Do not overdress because it makes you look like you are fake and trying too hard. Dress business casual. Cover over all tattoos if possible.
  2. Always speak as what is best for your children not what is best for you. The legal standard for child custody in Rhode Island is “best interest of the child”
  3. Always agree to try mediation. It is crucial that the judge believes you are attempting to settle the matter before the judge uses valuable court resources to decide your cause of action” http://rhodeislanddivorcelawyerarticles.com/articles/

You can contact Rhode Island Divorce and  RI Child Custody  Lawyer, David Slepkow, at 401-437-1100.

www.lawyersource360.com

David represent clients in paternity, uncontested no fault divorce, contested divorce, child support, adoption, restraining orders,  fathers rights, visitation and child custody across the State of Rhode Island including Providence, Pawtucket, East Providence, Barrington, Bristol, Warren, Newport, Warwick, Cranston, Cumberland, North Kingston, Johnston, Central falls, Woonsocket and lincoln Lincoln

Legal Notice per RI Rules of Professional Responsibility:

The Rhode Island Supreme Court licenses all lawyers and attorneys in the general practice of law, but does not license or certify any lawyer/ attorney as an expert or specialist in any field of practice

 

 

 

 

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