Navigating a High Conflict Divorce

Every divorce is stressful and and often brings out the worst out in most of us. However, a high conflict divorce is far more nerve-racking when couples engage in hostile or aggressive confrontation instead of using legal negotiation tools to resolve marital issues including child custody, child support, spousal support and the division of marital assets. Often times, high conflict divorces in Rhode island leave one or both parties unable to emotionally recover and get back to living a fulfilling and healthy life once the dissolution of marriage is complete.

preference of children

High conflict divorce in RI

High conflict divorce

Many high-conflict Rhode Island divorces involve serious issues that must be resolved before the end of the marriage can be finalized. Common problems that cause conflict include:

• An intense emotional investment between the couple
• Difficult family dynamics
• Questionable legal ambiguities
• Tangled financial problems
• Dirty tricks and antagonistic actions performed by one or more family members

These types of divorces often involve unremitting, ongoing hostility between the couple along with extended custody battles and drawn out court actions. In some situations, the RI Family Court judge will issue restraining orders as a way to keep the peace between the divorcing couple until the marriage can be dissolved.

Often times, divorcing couples will argue about hostile dependency where one spouse claims they have sacrificed their career to marry the other or raise their children.

When Children Are Involved in a  high conflict divorce in Rhode Island

In some divorces, one spouse lacks the ability to talk to their children and provide care on a personal level, which often leads to unnecessary high conflicts. Emotions and verbal confrontations often run rapid during the divorce.

Often times, differing parenting styles between the couple is a major factor that leads to the marriage’s dissolution. One parent may attempt to push their rules over the wishes of the other parent, which tends to escalate animosity between family members. When serious conflicts escalate between parents concerning issues about their children, it is best to turn the problems over to a reputable attorney who specializes in high conflict divorces.

Preventing Confrontation in Providence Family Court

In many divorce cases involving high conflicts, one spouse is unable to let go of a strong attachment to the other spouse. Conflict is often created as an interaction with a partner who is leaving the marriage. Often times, legal consultation and family counseling are absolutely necessary to ensure that both parties can resolve their issues and dissolve the marriage.

There are simple actions that can minimize the amount of conflict within the family’s dynamics during the divorce. These actions include:

• Accepting responsibility to live your own life,
• Making decisions that benefit everyone in the family,
• Avoiding pointing a finger of blame, shame or indignity at the other,
• Developing and maintaining healthy boundaries as a parent and ex-spouse,
• Honoring every financial agreement you made with your ex.

Many individuals make a major mistake when divorcing in Providence Family Court by failing to take steps to protect their rights. If you and your spouse are considering a divorce, but there is high conflict in the family dynamics, it is essential to seek legal advice. It is essential to pick a RI divorce attorney that has experience and skills in preventing confrontation while remaining invested in helping you dissolve your marriage.

“In the spring of 2010, an estimated 13.7 million parents had custody of 22.0 million children under 21 years of age while the other parent lived somewhere else.3 Although the population of the United States increased by 17.1 percent since 1994, the number of custodial parents was not statistically different from 1994 (Table 1).4 The 22.0 million children living with their custodial parent represented over one-quarter (26.2 percent) of all 83.8 million children under 21 years old living in families.5 Among White children in families, 22.4 percent lived with their custodial parents.” Custodial Mothers and Fathers and Their Child Support: 2009 Consumer Income http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p60-240.pdf

 

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