More Providence Family Court Tips & Some Divorce Stats

1. Perception is reality in Providence Family Court  Dress appropriately for your day in Providence Family Court. I have said this numerous times before!! Kent County Family Court in Warwick is not the beach. Washington County Family Court  is not a nightclub.  Newport Family Court is not a day at local 1st beach.

chil custody in Providence Family Court

Providence Family Court

Also, do not overdress as it makes you look like you are trying too hard TO IMPRESS and have something to hide.  Cover your tattoos, if possible.  Dress as if you are going out to dinner at a moderately priced restaurant. This means business casual is appropriate.

Win Your RI Custody Battle by not acting as a moron!  25 stupid mistakes to avoid. “The stupid and boorish behavior set forth below may impede or ruin your chances of getting Child  Custody in RI Family Court. All of the actions set forth below are actual behavior that I have seen in Providence Family Court”  http://rhodeislanddivorcelawyerarticles.com/win-your-ri-custody-case-by-not-acting-as-a-moron/ 

2. Avoid Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Avoid posting about your  Rhode Island divorce, custody or RI child support case. Judges are very concerned that your children will see your custodial posts during the course of your custody battle.

More importantly, do not post info that can be used against you indirectly or directly in your child custody, divorce or  RI child support cause of action. For example, in a RI child custody case do not allow any posts or pictures related to drinking or drug use. In a Rhode Island child support case, if you are claiming you cannot afford to pay support it will really hurt your case if there are posts showing you dining at fancy restaurants or getting bottle service at a local nightclub or going on fancy vacations with your girlfriend to Aruba.

3.  DO NOT be rude or get into a scrap with Court staff, constables, sheriffs, Clerks, Family Services investigators etc. Judges look to protect their staff and it will not help a litigant’s case if the Providence Family Court Magistrate or presiding justice is irate at a rude, intemperate or overly aggressive litigant.

3. Come to Court with Clean Hands. I will repeat it. Enter the courtroom with CLEAN Hands. You have been wronged. Your crazy ex-girlfriend wrongfully obtained a restraining order based on lies and false allegations preventing you from spending meaningful and important time with your child. You want your day in Court to expose her  lies and reinstate your relationship with your child. However, before you can open your mouth, one of the following things occurs:  (a) you flunk a court ordered drug test for smoking marijuana the night before, (b) The judge is informed that you failed and refused to pay child support for your children for the past three months or (c) You send her numerous alcohol induced nasty text messages calling her all sorts of obscene names.

Before you can even open your mouth to get justice and tell your story, the judge already perceives you negatively  and  the judge is more focused on your wrongs than the story you are attempting to tell.

also see: “7 RI Family Court TIPS for your Divorce, Custody or Visitation Case!” http://rhodeislanddivorcelawyerarticles.com/ri-family-court-tips/

The American Psychological Association reports: “Marriage and divorce are both common experiences. In Western cultures, more than 90 percent of people marry by age 50. Healthy marriages are good for couples’ mental and physical health. They are also good for children; growing up in a happy home protects children from mental, physical, educational and social problems. However, about 40 to 50 percent of married couples in the United States divorce. The divorce rate for subsequent marriages is even higher.” http://www.apa.org/topics/divorce/

The United States Census reported that “About 1 in 6 custodial parents were fathers (17.8 percent). More than one-quarter (26.2 percent) of all children under 21 years of age in families lived with only one of their parents…” http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/p60-240.pdf

 

 

 

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